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Dry Farming and Water Sustainability in the Walla Walla River Basin: Sharing the Research of Stanford Sustainable Waters Intern Tida Rau

Today, I am eager to tell you about Tida Rau, our Sustainable Waters Intern from The Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford University, who was nothing short of phenomenal in her role. A member of the Yakama and Lummi nations, Tida possesses a rare fusion of academic prowess and deep cultural understanding. Remarkable individuals like Tida are who will guide us on the path to a sustainable water future.

Explore the 2022 WWT Annual Report today

Washington Water Trust was founded in 1998 to forge a new path for restoring water to local rivers and streams. More than 25 years and hundreds of water transactions later, our collaborative approach continues delivering incredible results! Explore our 2022 Annual Report and get current on Washington Water Trust.

A Win for the Walla Walla Watershed

In case you missed it, Governor Inslee signed into law legislation that supports the Walla Walla Water 2050 plan in May. It is a significant milestone in efforts to improve stream flows and sustainably manage water supplies in the Walla Walla River Basin.

Helping salmon during the drought emergency

In case you missed it amid all the headlines of wildfires, heat domes, and reservoirs drying up around the world, here in Washington our Department of Ecology declared a drought emergency in 12 counties on Monday. The rest of the state is under a drought advisory. This drought will be hard on Washington’s fish and we’re working to reduce its impact.

See What You Made Possible in our 2021 Annual Report

“We are encouraged by all of you – our friends, supporters and partners – that see the writing on the wall; that recognize the urgent need to put water back instream so that our rivers, streams, fish, and communities here in Washington can be more resilient; so that we can have water flowing abundantly in our landscapes, bringing us joy and feeding our spirits.” - James Kraft, Executive Director

Teanaway: A Stream Flows Again

The Teanaway River, a critical tributary in the Yakima basin for salmon, steelhead and trout, struggled for many years, often running dry. Watch our new short film Teanaway: A Stream Flows Again to see how people are coming together to help the river make a comeback.

Washington’s Freshwater Under Stress from Drought

On July 14th the Washington State Department of Ecology declared a drought emergency for the entire state with the exception of Seattle, Tacoma, and Everett. Despite substantial snowpack accumulation over the winter and promising water supply forecasts, the second driest spring in Washington since 1895 combined with high temperatures this summer has led to acute snow melt and critical conditions for Washington’s freshwater.

Video: Can Recycled Water Help Save Salmon in the Sammamish?

In case you missed it the first time around, learn how Washington Water Trust and partners are exploring recycled water as a food crop irrigation source in the Sammamish Valley and how it could benefit salmon in the Sammamish and beyond.

Get to Know WWT’s Newest Team Members

Over the past year, we are thrilled to have added three new fantastic staff members: Sarah Dymecki, Nicole Gutierrez and Aiman Shahpurwala who have each kindly taken a moment to share their interests, experiences and roles at WWT. Get to know these amazing WWT team members!

Understanding and Monitoring Drought in Washington

The Washington State Department of Ecology monitors developing drought conditions each year. They use information such as snow pack accumulation, precipitation, temperature, and historic and current weather patterns to assess drought conditions statewide. However, it's not just the state that monitors drought conditions, the public can play an important role as well.