Washington Water Trust

Working to restore our state's rivers and streams.

WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL: SEATTLE FILM SELECTION

GET IN TOUCH WITH YOUR WILD SIDE!
5:30Happy Hour
6:30First Session
8:00Intermission & Drawings
8:30Second Session

Wild & Scenic Film Festival in Seattle: April 18, 2018

SIFF Cinema Egyptian | 5:30 PM

Washington Water Trust (WWT), a 501(c)(3) organization working to restore rivers and streams in Washington state, is hosting the Wild & Scenic Film Festival in Seattle. The event will be held at the SIFF Cinema Egyptian in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood. 


Wild & Scenic Film Festival: Seattle Film Selection

A Letter to Congress

Wallace Stegner’s 1960 letter to Congress about the importance of wilderness is the framework for a new message, one in which our unified voice can help prevent the transfer of our most valuable heritage— our public lands— to private and corporate interests.





The Shape of a River

At its core, The Shape of a River celebrates the Mighty Yellowstone as both partner and provider, ever-shaping the land and lives of those along its course and binding us to the very spirit of wildness. The film casts the story of the River through the eyes of those whose lives intersect with it in ways that run deep. Through them, we find a river that is fierce yet fragile, robust yet at risk.  





Where the Wild Things Play

Friday night at the local watering hole and … where the ladies at? Answer: BASE jumping from high desert cliffs, performing tricks on slacklines, climbing granite routes, shredding singletrack, skiing backcountry lines and generally leaving you fellas behind. This rowdy ode to female athletes by Krystle Wright leaves no doubt about the state of women in today’s outdoor world: badass.





The New Environmentalist: The Community They Fight For

Community activist Mark Lopez pushed government officials to provide comprehensive lead testing and cleanup of East Los Angeles homes contaminated by a battery smelter that had been operating for over three decades.






Loved By All: The Story of Apa Sherpa

Apa Sherpa has climbed Mount Everest 21 times, more than any other human. But he wouldn't wish this upon anybody. Having grown up in a region in Nepal, Apa was forced to leave school and work as a porter at age 12. His dreams of being a doctor forever lost. Apa aims to change this all-too-common story with his work at the Apa Sherpa Foundation. In the film we follow Pemba Sherpa, a child who must walk six hours a day to attend school. Pemba's story is a present-day reflection of Apa's past.




Blue Ventures 

In 2004, frustrated by failed marine conservation efforts, marine biologist Alasdair Harris encouraged a coastal Madagascar community to close off a small section of their octopus-fishing area. A few months later, the community saw huge increases in their catch and incomes. The model went viral, showing the world that protecting the ocean can and should go hand-in-hand with improving lives.





Nobody Dies in Longyearbyen

"They say that when you're hit by the polar bug, you never leave." Don't say we didn't warn you. Nobody dies in Longyearbyen, or so goes the rumor. We went to the northernmost city in the world to find out why, and stumbled into the first act of a science fiction flick about something deadly, long buried in the permafrost.




Wild Olympics

Follow paddlers Adam and Susan Elliott as they kayak, fish, packraft and explore the wild rivers of the Olympic Peninsula. The peninsula’s wild rivers provide clean water, world-class recreation and unmatched opportunities for inspiration and solitude. They bring jobs and economic benefits to local communities and provide critical habitat for salmon, steelhead and a variety of other fish and wildlife. Wild and Scenic designation–the strongest protection a river can receive–ensures that the free-flowing character, water quality and outstanding values of these rivers are protected for generations to come.




INTERMISSION


Imagination: Tom Wallisch

We’ve all been that kid sitting in the back seat of our family car, wishing we were somewhere else. Through the boredom, the driveway snow piles, sidewalk handrails and stair sets start to tease our inner skier. Watch day dreams come to life as Tom Wallisch shreds the snowy streets of Nelson, British Columbia.





Mothered by Mountains

Pasang Lhamu Sherpa Akita, Nepal’s leading female mountain guide, has been on top of the tallest peaks on Earth. When she teams up to make a first ascent with an unlikely partner - local punk-rock icon, Sareena Rai - they both find that the paths to the greatest summits lie within.






Brothers of Climbing

How can you be what you can’t see? Mikhail Martin, co-founder of Brothers of Climbing said, “I literally typed, ‘Are there black climbers?’ in Google … someone said, ‘black people don’t climb.'” A small group of climbers began to challenge that thought. The Brothers of Climbing is a crew that's making the climbing community more welcoming. Watch to see how they created a community where one wasn’t.





Canis Lupus Colorado

Ghosts are stirring in Colorado's high country. These are the guardians of a delicate balance. They haunt the trees, the water, the animals - the very fabric of the land itself. Gray wolves shaped this place for eons only to disappear nearly overnight. Canis Lupus Colorado is the story of the past, present, and future of Colorado's now extinct native wolf population. Now we're at a tipping point: the emerging west, the future of our public wildlands, and the health of vast ecosystems are all at stake. And the choice is up to us.





Rupununi: Fight for El Dorado

In the late 15th century, Sir Walter Raleigh set out on an ill-fated quest for El Dorado, the lost city of gold. Today, biologists are uncovering what the indigenous people of Guyana have known all along – that Rupununi is a place of untold riches, not only in minerals and oil, but in unrivaled biodiversity. Thanks to well-orchestrated efforts from indigenous communities and conservation biologists like Dr. Lesley De Souza, the Rupununi has the potential to become Guyana’s largest protected area (3 million acres). See this incredible landscape through the eyes of Macushi elders as they fight to protect the forests, rivers and seasonally flooded wetlands from unchecked development and habitat destruction.


Grandad

Every morning in the summer, Granddad rises at dawn to row twice around the lake. Join him on his morning meditation.